Joan Manuel Batista Foguet, Director of the ESADE Leadership Development Research Center (GLEAD), talks about the group's latest activities, research news and future plans ESADE Knowledge: What is the ultimate goal of GLEAD? Joan Manuel Batista: As we say on our website, our ultimate goal is to help people become the best version of themselves. This is reflected in the research we do, which focuses especially on increasing social and emotional competencies. EK: How is your group contributing to leadership development? JMB: We are contributing in several ways: sharing our research through academic conferences and publications and through various consulting projects where we bridge research and practice, bringing to light the applicability of our findings. Also through the LEAD program, which has helped thousands of future professionals to develop emotional and social competencies (ESCs). The program was developed by Professor Serlavós and inspired in the original LEAD program from Richard Boyatzis at Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University.We are also contributing to leadership development through projects developed with international research groups, where we broaden the scope of our knowledge, attitudes and perceptions about the vast world of leadership development. EK: What are your plans for this academic course? JMB: Our plans are to continue our high-quality output and strengthen our relationships with our partners. We also intend to expand and grow with the new members who have joined the team. For instance, new recruit Jordi Quoidbach will introduce elements of quasi-experimental design into his research about the determinants of the decision-making process, felt emotions and overall happiness. With Katharina Schmid, the focus of our research has expanded from individual development to group and team processes, social identity and attitudes, diversity and conflict management. With his focus on HRM processes within organizations, Jordi Trullen will contribute by looking at firms' practices. Finally, we have added a new research line on the practice of mindfulness. This is a topic closely related to our usual field that has been increasingly recognized by the scientific community as an effective strategy for reducing stress and increasing well-being. EK: How are you bridging the gap between research and practice? JMB: For us, this is one of the most fascinating stages of the research process: when you are able to open Pandora's box and let the conclusions of your research lead your actions and those of others to bring about real change. Our LEAD program is also based on our research, and every year we adjust our knowledge to the reality of the professionals who participate in the program. We collect data with them and about them and observe how changes occur, so we are able to adjust and adapt our previously established knowledge to the ever-changing human nature. Our research is also translated into the teaching of departmental core courses in undergraduate programs, where Katharina Schmid, Daniela Noethen and Jordi Trullen bring new insights from their own research whenever possible. However, we also take every opportunity to 'hook' organizations for our research. For instance, a few months ago at a conference, we persuaded the brand managers of an important bank to participate in a study on how branch managers' ESCs, cognitive intelligence and personality traits predict leadership effectiveness and branch performance. The study also examined the role played by the quality of internal relationships. We have also fostered coaching interventions with brand managers to evaluate the effect of the coaching sessions on Emotional and Social Competencies (ESC) development and eventually on performance. In Tokyo, Jordi Quoidbach may have the opportunity to assess how the practice of mindfulness might help the leaders of organizations make better decisions by reducing common cognitive biases (e.g., loss aversion and inter-temporal time discounting). In our ideal scenario, these studies are conducted both in the lab with business students and in organizations, where management occurs in real life.

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"Our ultimate goal is to help people become the best version of themselves"

10/2017

Joan Manuel Batista Foguet, Director of the ESADE Leadership Development Research Center (GLEAD), talks about the group's latest activities, research news and future plans



ESADE Knowledge: What is the ultimate goal of GLEAD?


Joan Manuel Batista: As we say on our website, our ultimate goal is to help people become the best version of themselves. This is reflected in the research we do, which focuses especially on increasing social and emotional competencies.


EK: How is your group contributing to leadership development?


JMB: We are contributing in several ways: sharing our research through academic conferences and publications and through various consulting projects where we bridge research and practice, bringing to light the applicability of our findings. Also through the LEAD program, which has helped thousands of future professionals to develop emotional and social competencies (ESCs). The program was developed by Professor Serlavós and inspired in the original LEAD program from Richard Boyatzis at Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University.

We are also contributing to leadership development through projects developed with international research groups, where we broaden the scope of our knowledge, attitudes and perceptions about the vast world of leadership development.


EK: What are your plans for this academic course?


JMB: Our plans are to continue our high-quality output and strengthen our relationships with our partners. We also intend to expand and grow with the new members who have joined the team. For instance, new recruit Jordi Quoidbach will introduce elements of quasi-experimental design into his research about the determinants of the decision-making process, felt emotions and overall happiness. With Katharina Schmid, the focus of our research has expanded from individual development to group and team processes, social identity and attitudes, diversity and conflict management. With his focus on HRM processes within organizations, Jordi Trullen will contribute by looking at firms' practices.


Finally, we have added a new research line on the practice of mindfulness. This is a topic closely related to our usual field that has been increasingly recognized by the scientific community as an effective strategy for reducing stress and increasing well-being.


EK: How are you bridging the gap between research and practice?


JMB: For us, this is one of the most fascinating stages of the research process: when you are able to open Pandora's box and let the conclusions of your research lead your actions and those of others to bring about real change. Our LEAD program is also based on our research, and every year we adjust our knowledge to the reality of the professionals who participate in the program. We collect data with them and about them and observe how changes occur, so we are able to adjust and adapt our previously established knowledge to the ever-changing human nature. 


Our research is also translated into the teaching of departmental core courses in undergraduate programs, where Katharina Schmid, Daniela Noethen and Jordi Trullen bring new insights from their own research whenever possible. 


However, we also take every opportunity to 'hook' organizations for our research. For instance, a few months ago at a conference, we persuaded the brand managers of an important bank to participate in a study on how branch managers' ESCs, cognitive intelligence and personality traits predict leadership effectiveness and branch performance. The study also examined the role played by the quality of internal relationships. 


We have also fostered coaching interventions with brand managers to evaluate the effect of the coaching sessions on Emotional and Social Competencies (ESC) development and eventually on performance. In Tokyo, Jordi Quoidbach may have the opportunity to assess how the practice of mindfulness might help the leaders of organizations make better decisions by reducing common cognitive biases (e.g., loss aversion and inter-temporal time discounting). 


In our ideal scenario, these studies are conducted both in the lab with business students and in organizations, where management occurs in real life.


<< Back to home