The quest for responsible leadership is a response to recent business scandals and calls for more ethical managerial conduct and the result of changes and new demands in the global marketplace (Pless, Maak & Stahl, 2011; Puffer & McCarthy, 2008; Waldman & Galvin, 2008). One demand is the expectation of stakeholders that corporations and their leaders will take a more active role as citizens in society and contribute to the 'triple bottom line' (Elkington, 1997) by creating environmental, social, and economic value. In essence, these calls acknowledge that leadership exerts its influence in a global stakeholder environment and therefore demand that leaders 'contribute to the creation of economic and societal progress in a globally responsible and sustainable way' (EFMD, 2005: 3). As the growing number of public-private partnerships, social innovations, and leadership initiatives indicate, increasing numbers of business leaders accept their responsibility to help find solutions to pressing global problems, such as poverty, environmental degradation, pandemic diseases, and human rights. Surveys of senior executives conducted by the strategy consultancy McKinsey & Co. (McKinsey, 2006, 2010) reveal that a knowing-doing gap persists with regard to responsible leadership: executives recognise their broader responsibilities as global citizens, but they struggle to cope effectively with wider social, political, and environmental issues. In this paper we intend to throw light on this gap by looking into examples of successful entrepreneurs who have chosen to design for human dignity, that is, to engage in entrepreneurial activities that tackle social challenges by employing entrepreneurial means. We conducted field research on three case examples of social business leaders in South America (Paraguay), Africa (Uganda), and Asia (Cambodia). Our findings offer compelling insights into the practice of responsible leadership-and thus the motifs, traits, and actions of committed individuals whose purpose in life became to design organisations that help to address pressing social issues and ensure human dignity.

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Mannen, Delia; Maak, Thomas; Pless, Nicola

Art as an expression of organizational identity: A view into the Cleveland clinic collection and its meaning in the design for human dignity

The quest for responsible leadership is a response to recent business scandals and calls for more ethical managerial conduct and the result of changes and new demands in the global marketplace (Pless, Maak & Stahl, 2011; Puffer & McCarthy, 2008; Waldman & Galvin, 2008). One demand is the expectation of stakeholders that corporations and their leaders will take a more active role as citizens in society and contribute to the 'triple bottom line' (Elkington, 1997) by creating environmental, social, and economic value. In essence, these calls acknowledge that leadership exerts its influence in a global stakeholder environment and therefore demand that leaders 'contribute to the creation of economic and societal progress in a globally responsible and sustainable way' (EFMD, 2005: 3). As the growing number of public-private partnerships, social innovations, and leadership initiatives indicate, increasing numbers of business leaders accept their responsibility to help find solutions to pressing global problems, such as poverty, environmental degradation, pandemic diseases, and human rights. Surveys of senior executives conducted by the strategy consultancy McKinsey & Co. (McKinsey, 2006, 2010) reveal that a knowing-doing gap persists with regard to responsible leadership: executives recognise their broader responsibilities as global citizens, but they struggle to cope effectively with wider social, political, and environmental issues. In this paper we intend to throw light on this gap by looking into examples of successful entrepreneurs who have chosen to design for human dignity, that is, to engage in entrepreneurial activities that tackle social challenges by employing entrepreneurial means. We conducted field research on three case examples of social business leaders in South America (Paraguay), Africa (Uganda), and Asia (Cambodia). Our findings offer compelling insights into the practice of responsible leadership-and thus the motifs, traits, and actions of committed individuals whose purpose in life became to design organisations that help to address pressing social issues and ensure human dignity.
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Art as an expression of organizational identity: A view into the Cleveland clinic collection and its meaning in the design for human dignity
Mannen, Delia; Maak, Thomas; Pless, Nicola
29th EGOS Colloquium
HEC Montral
Berln (Germany), 04/07/2013 - 06/07/2013

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