Environmental performance is a concern for managers due to reasons ranging from regulatory and contractual compliance, to public perception and competitive advantage (Theyel, 2001). Green or Environmental SCM is a concept that is gaining popularity. Many realize that customers and other stakeholders do not always distinguish between a company and its suppliers. Stakeholders often hold the lead company in a particular supply chain responsible for the adverse environmental impacts of all organisations within its supply chain (Rao and Holt, 2005). In the literature many of the existing studies focus either on the impact of supply collaborative practices on environmental performance (Florida, 1996; Handfield et al., 1997; Walton et al, 1998; Geffen and Rothenberg, 2000), either on the evaluative practices, such as supplier assessment and certification (Krut and Karasin, 1999). Among the few that consider both simultaneously, we have to point out Lamming and Hampson (1996) and Klassen and Vachon (2003). Organizations have used a range of supplier relationship management styles to improve production processes or introduce new technologies into the supply chain (Dyer and Chu, 2003). A small but growing body of research has more recently explored the influence of a customer's relationship with its suppliers in regard to the extension of sustainability-based goals (Simpson et al, 2007). Simpson et al (2007) point out that the inclusion of environmental performance standards in supply requirements is marching ahead with only limited theory on the managerial implications of this type of inter-organisational action. "Many additional questions still remain surrounding the relationship factors that may support, influence or degrade any customer or supplier-driven program of supply greening" (Simpson et al, 2007). Klassen and Vachon (2003) also point out the need to examine in greater detail the implications of individual interorganizational supply chain activities. The aim of this paper is to analyse how companies are extending their green practices to other supply chain members: Are firms using a controlling and/or a collaborative approach? What are the contextual factors that explain when one approach is more suitable than the other? What are the environmental results of each approach?

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Giménez Thomsen, Cristina; Large , Rudolf; Segarra Costa, Enric

Environmental SCM: Extending sustainable practices to suppliers

Environmental performance is a concern for managers due to reasons ranging from regulatory and contractual compliance, to public perception and competitive advantage (Theyel, 2001). Green or Environmental SCM is a concept that is gaining popularity. Many realize that customers and other stakeholders do not always distinguish between a company and its suppliers. Stakeholders often hold the lead company in a particular supply chain responsible for the adverse environmental impacts of all organisations within its supply chain (Rao and Holt, 2005). In the literature many of the existing studies focus either on the impact of supply collaborative practices on environmental performance (Florida, 1996; Handfield et al., 1997; Walton et al, 1998; Geffen and Rothenberg, 2000), either on the evaluative practices, such as supplier assessment and certification (Krut and Karasin, 1999). Among the few that consider both simultaneously, we have to point out Lamming and Hampson (1996) and Klassen and Vachon (2003). Organizations have used a range of supplier relationship management styles to improve production processes or introduce new technologies into the supply chain (Dyer and Chu, 2003). A small but growing body of research has more recently explored the influence of a customer's relationship with its suppliers in regard to the extension of sustainability-based goals (Simpson et al, 2007). Simpson et al (2007) point out that the inclusion of environmental performance standards in supply requirements is marching ahead with only limited theory on the managerial implications of this type of inter-organisational action. "Many additional questions still remain surrounding the relationship factors that may support, influence or degrade any customer or supplier-driven program of supply greening" (Simpson et al, 2007). Klassen and Vachon (2003) also point out the need to examine in greater detail the implications of individual interorganizational supply chain activities. The aim of this paper is to analyse how companies are extending their green practices to other supply chain members: Are firms using a controlling and/or a collaborative approach? What are the contextual factors that explain when one approach is more suitable than the other? What are the environmental results of each approach?
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Environmental SCM: Extending sustainable practices to suppliers
Giménez Thomsen, Cristina; Large , Rudolf; Segarra Costa, Enric
3rd World Conference on Production and Operations Management (POM-2002)
Japanese Operations Management and Strategy Association (JOMSA)
Bruselas (Belgium), 05/08/2008 - 08/08/2008

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