This paper presents an empirical psychometric study examining the relationships between personal and organizational factors, stress, physical and mental health and long-term cardiovascular risk. A number of innovative approaches were designed and tested to reliably measure, either directly or by proxy, a range of affective states, physical and mental health conditions, and complex composite diagnostic measures such as Metabolic Syndrome (MS). The objective of the study was to evaluate the way in which personal characteristics and organizational conditions contribute to stress and both short-term and long-term health. By analyzing the complex relationships and feedback effects of physical and mental health, it is possible to gain a better understanding of the effects of working conditions and stress climate on long-term health. At its core, this study was designed to be a stepping stone to bridge the fields of organizational behavior and occupational health psychology with the prominent medical research dealing with long-term cardiovascular risk. The end goal is a more accurate understanding of the influence that personal and work factors have in regard to cardiovascular health in order to design effective workplace and lifestyle interventions. The methods employed in this study included surveys completed by 1709 nurses working in the Catalunya province of Spain. The questionnaire included personal lifestyle factors, work conditions and attitudes, stress and burnout, and a physiological assessment of physical and mental health, somatic complaints, and a detailed list of medication usage. A number of innovative approaches were used to assess risk including a proxy measure for MS based on BMI, blood pressure, and medications for cholesterol and diabetes. Preliminary findings indicate that the proxy measure for MS was reliably linked to the self-reported measures of physical health. MS was found to moderate the effects of physical health on the usage of mental health medication and on somatic health complaints. Findings also revealed a complex relationship between burnout, physical health, and MS. Some direct effects were noted between burnout and MS and indirect effects were noted through lifestyle factors such as exercise and spousal support and organizational factors such as colleague support and job involvement and absenteeism. The primary conclusions confirmed the feasible of measuring cardiovascular risk in psychometric studies by use of proxy measures to study lifestyle and work factors that contribute to these risks. Initial findings are presented as well as suggestions for refinement of the approach for future studies.

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Moodie, Scott William; Dolan, Simon; Arsenault , André

Exploring the multiple linkages between the metabolic syndrome and stress: An empirical analysis of the relationships between stress, health, and metabolic syndrome among Catalan nurses

This paper presents an empirical psychometric study examining the relationships between personal and organizational factors, stress, physical and mental health and long-term cardiovascular risk. A number of innovative approaches were designed and tested to reliably measure, either directly or by proxy, a range of affective states, physical and mental health conditions, and complex composite diagnostic measures such as Metabolic Syndrome (MS). The objective of the study was to evaluate the way in which personal characteristics and organizational conditions contribute to stress and both short-term and long-term health. By analyzing the complex relationships and feedback effects of physical and mental health, it is possible to gain a better understanding of the effects of working conditions and stress climate on long-term health. At its core, this study was designed to be a stepping stone to bridge the fields of organizational behavior and occupational health psychology with the prominent medical research dealing with long-term cardiovascular risk. The end goal is a more accurate understanding of the influence that personal and work factors have in regard to cardiovascular health in order to design effective workplace and lifestyle interventions. The methods employed in this study included surveys completed by 1709 nurses working in the Catalunya province of Spain. The questionnaire included personal lifestyle factors, work conditions and attitudes, stress and burnout, and a physiological assessment of physical and mental health, somatic complaints, and a detailed list of medication usage. A number of innovative approaches were used to assess risk including a proxy measure for MS based on BMI, blood pressure, and medications for cholesterol and diabetes. Preliminary findings indicate that the proxy measure for MS was reliably linked to the self-reported measures of physical health. MS was found to moderate the effects of physical health on the usage of mental health medication and on somatic health complaints. Findings also revealed a complex relationship between burnout, physical health, and MS. Some direct effects were noted between burnout and MS and indirect effects were noted through lifestyle factors such as exercise and spousal support and organizational factors such as colleague support and job involvement and absenteeism. The primary conclusions confirmed the feasible of measuring cardiovascular risk in psychometric studies by use of proxy measures to study lifestyle and work factors that contribute to these risks. Initial findings are presented as well as suggestions for refinement of the approach for future studies.
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Exploring the multiple linkages between the metabolic syndrome and stress: An empirical analysis of the relationships between stress, health, and metabolic syndrome among Catalan nurses
Moodie, Scott William; Dolan, Simon; Arsenault , André
1st International Conference on Prehypertension and Cardio Metabolic Syndrome (PreHT), Vienna 2011
The International conference on prehypertension and cardio-metabolic syndrome
Viena (Austria), 24/02/2011 - 27/02/2011

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