While most of the measurement instruments of Emotional Intelligence (EI) are clearly focused on one of the many competing models, research has shown that correlation among some of these models is as low as .21 (Brackett & Mayer, 2003) making it difficult to argue that they are measuring the same thing (Cherniss, 2010). Taking a similar approach, but limited to one of these models, this study establishes convergent validity among two different instruments used to measure Emotional and Social Competencies from a behavioral perspective. On the one hand, the Emotional and Social Competencies Inventory - University Edition (ESCI-U) is a multi-rater questionnaire used in a leadership development course to evaluate 14 emotional and social competencies and 2 cognitive competencies (Boyatzis, 1995; Boyatzis & Sala, 2004). On the other hand, the Critical Incident Interview (CII), also called Behavioral Event Interview (BEI) is a technique in which participants relate real experiences (McClelland, 1998) and are then coded based on seven emotional and social competencies which coincide with those of the ESCI-U. For this study, we are comparing informant results of the 360º questionnaires from 100 students who have also participated in voluntary interviews. The interviews have been coded by two trained coders with an inter-coder reliability of > 0,7 and then discussed to reach 100% agreement on presence of competencies for a final result. We are expecting a high correlation among competencies that seem generally "inherent" to MBA students, such as Achievement Orientation or Influence. Low correlations on some competencies (e.g. Teamwork or Empathy) can be indicators of projections from the raters of 360º evaluations comparable to social desirability or preferences made by interviewees when choosing the incidents they decide to mention during the interview process. The results have practical implications on how these instruments are most effectively applied in education and development.

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Batista Foguet, Joan M.; Boyatzis, Richard; Serlavós Serra, Ricard

Measuring emotional and social competencies: Establishing convergent validity between the ESCI-U questionnaire and critical incident interviews

While most of the measurement instruments of Emotional Intelligence (EI) are clearly focused on one of the many competing models, research has shown that correlation among some of these models is as low as .21 (Brackett & Mayer, 2003) making it difficult to argue that they are measuring the same thing (Cherniss, 2010). Taking a similar approach, but limited to one of these models, this study establishes convergent validity among two different instruments used to measure Emotional and Social Competencies from a behavioral perspective. On the one hand, the Emotional and Social Competencies Inventory - University Edition (ESCI-U) is a multi-rater questionnaire used in a leadership development course to evaluate 14 emotional and social competencies and 2 cognitive competencies (Boyatzis, 1995; Boyatzis & Sala, 2004). On the other hand, the Critical Incident Interview (CII), also called Behavioral Event Interview (BEI) is a technique in which participants relate real experiences (McClelland, 1998) and are then coded based on seven emotional and social competencies which coincide with those of the ESCI-U. For this study, we are comparing informant results of the 360º questionnaires from 100 students who have also participated in voluntary interviews. The interviews have been coded by two trained coders with an inter-coder reliability of > 0,7 and then discussed to reach 100% agreement on presence of competencies for a final result. We are expecting a high correlation among competencies that seem generally "inherent" to MBA students, such as Achievement Orientation or Influence. Low correlations on some competencies (e.g. Teamwork or Empathy) can be indicators of projections from the raters of 360º evaluations comparable to social desirability or preferences made by interviewees when choosing the incidents they decide to mention during the interview process. The results have practical implications on how these instruments are most effectively applied in education and development.
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Measuring emotional and social competencies: Establishing convergent validity between the ESCI-U questionnaire and critical incident interviews
Batista Foguet, Joan M.; Boyatzis, Richard; Serlavós Serra, Ricard
5th Conference of the European Survey Research Association (ESRA 2013)
European Survey Research Association (ESRA)
Southampton (United States of America), 15/07/2013 - 19/07/2013

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