Is creativity a skill or an innate quality? Can groups be more creative together than isolated individuals? ESADE Principal Investigator Nuria Agell and her colleagues have developed new computational intelligence software tools that boost creativity in organizations. The research findings were published in the IEEE Computational Intelligence Magazine and are part of a larger study on computational intelligence funded by the European Commission.  "Organizations can no longer survive without creativity in today's complex world. Our software allows organizations to find creative solutions to solve complex problems," says Agell. The power of joint thinking Instead of helping isolated individuals to be more creative, the software helps groups to boost social creativity. "Joint thinking is more powerful than individual creativity alone. Combining the knowledge, abilities and expertise of people with different perspectives leads to higher creativity levels," says mathematician Agell.  Why is social creativity so important for businesses? Most scientific and business innovations come from interactions with others and from joint thinking. "Bringing together users from different backgrounds and with diverse points of view speeds up the creation of new ideas and business solutions."3 software tools to boost social creativity The software tools developed by the COLLAGE Consortium are Open Source and allow users to enhance creativity in collaborative work environments. The COLLAGE consortium is formed by ESADE Business and Law School (Spain), London City University (UK), INSEAD (France), Institute of Communication and Computer Systems (Greece), PlayGen Ltd (UK), Exact Learning Solutions S.p.A. (Italy), FIAT (Italy) and WAAG Society (The Netherlands).  Here are a few of the tools that the COLLAGE consortium has come up with so far:  1. CRUISE (Creative User Centric Inspirational Search) This software helps users come up with new creative ideas by discovering inspirational content published online. The exploration starts with a simple search of one or more terms, for instance, "concept design". Once the user clicks on the search button, the software constructs a cloud of high frequency terms found in recent popular tweets, as well as links, videos and images.   "The software filters content to enhance serendipity. The search tool uses an algorithm that calculates and ranks the top ten results that are most relevant to the user," says Agell. CRUISE lets users interactively explore online content and relate concepts, ideas and elements to provide them with surprising or inspirational information that enhances creativity.     2. BrightSparks Have you ever wondered how a genius or a historical figure would solve something you are struggling with? BrightSparks is a software that searches the web to find problem-solvers with support from famous and relevant characters. You simply type your challenge and the application selects a random character, learns about him or her, and provides you with creative clues and open questions and answers based on this character to help you solve your problem.  3. CER: Finding the Right Expert This software helps organizations find the right expert to speed up creativity and innovation. The user only needs to enter the skills he or she is looking for and the desired level of expertise (high, medium or low) and the system automatically finds and recommends experts who match these criteria.  How can this research benefit companies and executives? Computational intelligence software tools can help companies and organizations to improve their levels of innovation and creativity, and make it much easier for executives to 'think outside the box' and so find creative solutions to complex problems. Using these tools in company group settings would speed up the creation of new ideas and business solutions.

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New computational intelligence software boosts social creativity

10/2017

Is creativity a skill or an innate quality? Can groups be more creative together than isolated individuals?


ESADE Principal Investigator Nuria Agell and her colleagues have developed new computational intelligence software tools that boost creativity in organizations. 

The research findings were published in the IEEE Computational Intelligence Magazine and are part of a larger study on computational intelligence funded by the European Commission.  

"Organizations can no longer survive without creativity in today's complex world. Our software allows organizations to find creative solutions to solve complex problems," says Agell.

The power of joint thinking


Instead of helping isolated individuals to be more creative, the software helps groups to boost social creativity. "Joint thinking is more powerful than individual creativity alone. Combining the knowledge, abilities and expertise of people with different perspectives leads to higher creativity levels," says mathematician Agell. 

Why is social creativity so important for businesses? 

Most scientific and business innovations come from interactions with others and from joint thinking. "Bringing together users from different backgrounds and with diverse points of view speeds up the creation of new ideas and business solutions."

3 software tools to boost social creativity


The software tools developed by the COLLAGE Consortium are Open Source and allow users to enhance creativity in collaborative work environments. The COLLAGE consortium is formed by ESADE Business and Law School (Spain), London City University (UK), INSEAD (France), Institute of Communication and Computer Systems (Greece), PlayGen Ltd (UK), Exact Learning Solutions S.p.A. (Italy), FIAT (Italy) and WAAG Society (The Netherlands). 

Here are a few of the tools that the COLLAGE consortium has come up with so far:

 

1. CRUISE (Creative User Centric Inspirational Search)

This software helps users come up with new creative ideas by discovering inspirational content published online. The exploration starts with a simple search of one or more terms, for instance, "concept design". Once the user clicks on the search button, the software constructs a cloud of high frequency terms found in recent popular tweets, as well as links, videos and images. 

 

"The software filters content to enhance serendipity. The search tool uses an algorithm that calculates and ranks the top ten results that are most relevant to the user," says Agell. CRUISE lets users interactively explore online content and relate concepts, ideas and elements to provide them with surprising or inspirational information that enhances creativity.  

 

2. BrightSparks

Have you ever wondered how a genius or a historical figure would solve something you are struggling with? BrightSparks is a software that searches the web to find problem-solvers with support from famous and relevant characters. You simply type your challenge and the application selects a random character, learns about him or her, and provides you with creative clues and open questions and answers based on this character to help you solve your problem.

 

3. CER: Finding the Right Expert

This software helps organizations find the right expert to speed up creativity and innovation. The user only needs to enter the skills he or she is looking for and the desired level of expertise (high, medium or low) and the system automatically finds and recommends experts who match these criteria.

 

How can this research benefit companies and executives?


Computational intelligence software tools can help companies and organizations to improve their levels of innovation and creativity, and make it much easier for executives to 'think outside the box' and so find creative solutions to complex problems. Using these tools in company group settings would speed up the creation of new ideas and business solutions.
More Knowledge
Facilitating creativity in collaborative work with computational intelligence software
Apostolou , Dimitris; Zachos , Konstantinos; Maiden , Neil; Agell Jan, Nria; Snchez Hernndez, German; Taramigkou , Maria; Star , Kam; Wippoo , Meia
IEEE Computational Intelligence Magazine
Vol. 11, n 2, 05/2016, p. 29 - 40
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