The purpose of this thesis is to explore and describe what changes are necessary in the management of business schools in order for them to become socially responsible institutions, and how can the needed process of change be implemented. The thesis upholds that education in responsible business does not depend exclusively on curriculum, but should expand its scope to involve the entire institution towards the objective of educating students for becoming responsible and ethical business leaders. Consequently, a model is proposed for the transformation of a business school into a socially responsible institution. The thesis is paper-based, and comprises eight academic contributions; the first one consists in a literature review on Corporate Social Responsibility which reveals the profusion of related definitions, theories, approaches, and their development. The second paper contributes to the significance and better understanding of University Social Responsibility through a literature review of its origins and evolution. A following article, Socially Responsible Business Schools: Collective stakeholders' voices demand urgent actions, addresses key stakeholders' arguments that provide deans with plenty of criteria for change, and stresses the insufficiency of AACSB's accreditation requirements to improve business ethics and social responsibility education. The conclusions of this article prompted a Virtuous circle for socially responsible business schools, which is constructed with PRME, the leading accreditation bodies, and the Beyond Grey Pinstripes (BGP) ranking for synergistically impelling the transformation of business schools. Inasmuch as the BGP survey and its Global 100 ranking form part of the proposed virtuous circle, a following article, Assessing what it takes to earn a Beyond Grey Pinstripes Ranking, addresses its significance and methodology, since it is the only one that focuses on the curricula and research content of ethics, social responsibility, and sustainability in MBA programmes. The need for the transformation of business schools is thus confirmed, and with this conviction in mind, a paper on A strategic change at business schools towards business ethics, social responsibility, and sustainability education ensued. The next article was co-authored on Responsible business education: Not a question of curriculum but a raison d'être, which stresses the importance of developing an identity in business schools in relation to ethics and social responsibility. Finally, the contributions of this thesis culminate in a proposal of A model for the transformation of business schools into socially responsible institutions, which centres people as the ultimate reason of all school activity, directing all policies and strategies towards a responsible management in which the dimensions of ethics, social responsibility, and sustainability are embedded and integrated in all aspects of the organisation.

ESADE

Back to home

Martell Sotomayor, Janette

Socially responsible business schools: A proposed model

10/2011
itemDefault The purpose of this thesis is to explore and describe what changes are necessary in the management of business schools in order for them to become socially responsible institutions, and how can the needed process of change be implemented. The thesis upholds that education in responsible business does not depend exclusively on curriculum, but should expand its scope to involve the entire institution towards the objective of educating students for becoming responsible and ethical business leaders. Consequently, a model is proposed for the transformation of a business school into a socially responsible institution. The thesis is paper-based, and comprises eight academic contributions; the first one consists in a literature review on Corporate Social Responsibility which reveals the profusion of related definitions, theories, approaches, and their development. The second paper contributes to the significance and better understanding of University Social Responsibility through a literature review of its origins and evolution. A following article, Socially Responsible Business Schools: Collective stakeholders' voices demand urgent actions, addresses key stakeholders' arguments that provide deans with plenty of criteria for change, and stresses the insufficiency of AACSB's accreditation requirements to improve business ethics and social responsibility education. The conclusions of this article prompted a Virtuous circle for socially responsible business schools, which is constructed with PRME, the leading accreditation bodies, and the Beyond Grey Pinstripes (BGP) ranking for synergistically impelling the transformation of business schools. Inasmuch as the BGP survey and its Global 100 ranking form part of the proposed virtuous circle, a following article, Assessing what it takes to earn a Beyond Grey Pinstripes Ranking, addresses its significance and methodology, since it is the only one that focuses on the curricula and research content of ethics, social responsibility, and sustainability in MBA programmes. The need for the transformation of business schools is thus confirmed, and with this conviction in mind, a paper on A strategic change at business schools towards business ethics, social responsibility, and sustainability education ensued. The next article was co-authored on Responsible business education: Not a question of curriculum but a raison d'être, which stresses the importance of developing an identity in business schools in relation to ethics and social responsibility. Finally, the contributions of this thesis culminate in a proposal of A model for the transformation of business schools into socially responsible institutions, which centres people as the ultimate reason of all school activity, directing all policies and strategies towards a responsible management in which the dimensions of ethics, social responsibility, and sustainability are embedded and integrated in all aspects of the organisation.
More Knowledge
Socially responsible business schools: A proposed model
Martell Sotomayor, Janette
Universitat Ramon Llull (URL). ESADE

Download full text (There might be some restrictions due to copyright or licenses)

  • fullText
  • File 1 (12.89Mb) pdf

Related publications

Back to home