Entrepreneurship can be defined as "the process by which people discover and exploit new business opportunities, often through the creation of new business ventures" (Aldrich & Cliff, 2003:575). As a research field, some scholars emphasize the emergence of new business opportunities and others the emergence of new organizations. Entrepreneurship researchers have paid significant attention to the role of social net-works and the mechanisms through which they influence the entrepreneurial process. Network-based arguments have clearly informed research on two critical tasks of the entrepreneurial process: the discovery of new business opportunities and the mobilization of resources. Thus, the overarching research question this thesis aims to respond is: What role social and business networks play in the emergence of new ventures and new business opportunities? The thesis examines the role of different types of networks in different entrepreneurial settings at both individual and firm levels. By focusing on under-researched settings, such as the family of origin, female entrepreneurship in patriarchal societies and micromultinationals, the thesis offers novel insights on the role of networks in the entrepreneurial process. More specifically, the findings of Essay 1 show that that the socioeconomic characteristics of the family of origin influence in significant ways entrepreneurs' means at hand (in terms of identity, knowledge, network and personal finance) and, as a consequence, also affect the key processes involved in business venture creation (opportunity recognition, launch decision, and resource mobilization). The findings of Essay 2 reveal that the main barriers and constraints faced by women entrepreneurs are gender-specific, rooted on national culture and the institutional environment. However, networking appears as the key factor for these women entrepreneurs to overcome such barriers. The findings of Essay 3 show that affiliation to a business group translates into a stronger domestic orientation and affiliated micromultinationals are less prone to expand internationally as compared to their stand-alone counterparts.

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Kalafatoglu, Tugba

The role of networks in the emergence of new business opportunities and new ventures in different geographic contexts

06/2018
itemDefault Entrepreneurship can be defined as "the process by which people discover and exploit new business opportunities, often through the creation of new business ventures" (Aldrich & Cliff, 2003:575). As a research field, some scholars emphasize the emergence of new business opportunities and others the emergence of new organizations. Entrepreneurship researchers have paid significant attention to the role of social net-works and the mechanisms through which they influence the entrepreneurial process. Network-based arguments have clearly informed research on two critical tasks of the entrepreneurial process: the discovery of new business opportunities and the mobilization of resources. Thus, the overarching research question this thesis aims to respond is: What role social and business networks play in the emergence of new ventures and new business opportunities? The thesis examines the role of different types of networks in different entrepreneurial settings at both individual and firm levels. By focusing on under-researched settings, such as the family of origin, female entrepreneurship in patriarchal societies and micromultinationals, the thesis offers novel insights on the role of networks in the entrepreneurial process. More specifically, the findings of Essay 1 show that that the socioeconomic characteristics of the family of origin influence in significant ways entrepreneurs' means at hand (in terms of identity, knowledge, network and personal finance) and, as a consequence, also affect the key processes involved in business venture creation (opportunity recognition, launch decision, and resource mobilization). The findings of Essay 2 reveal that the main barriers and constraints faced by women entrepreneurs are gender-specific, rooted on national culture and the institutional environment. However, networking appears as the key factor for these women entrepreneurs to overcome such barriers. The findings of Essay 3 show that affiliation to a business group translates into a stronger domestic orientation and affiliated micromultinationals are less prone to expand internationally as compared to their stand-alone counterparts.
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The role of networks in the emergence of new business opportunities and new ventures in different geographic contexts
Kalafatoglu, Tugba
ESADE Business School

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