José Ricardo Roriz President, Federação das Indústrias do Estado de São Paulo (FIESP) Given that the world's most developed countries are embarking on the 4th Industrial Revolution, the new book Liderança e Cultura Organizacional para Inovação [Leadership and Organizational Culture for Innovation] by ESADE visiting professors João Brillo and Jaap Boonstra is particularly timely. The book is both a warning and an invitation to Brazilian managers in the private and public sectors. The warning is clear: Brazil cannot afford to miss the chance of modernizing its economy. The invitation is just as important. Basing their arguments on practical theories and examples, the authors show how one can make a success of innovation. Industry 4.0 (as the 4th Industrial Revolution has been called) is nothing more than the interconnection of state-of-the-art machines overseen by managers acting under the umbrella of innovation, in a process of permanent change, online. Technologies and human resources become fully integrated in companies when the aforementioned strands are properly interwoven. I have traveled the world to get a closer look at innovative corporate and governmental experiences, some as paradigmatic as the cases presented by Brillo and Boonstra. What I saw in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Israel - were settings integrating concepts such as Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, The Internet of Things, Additive Manufacturing, Augmented Reality, Robotics, Intelligent Sensors, Virtual Simulations. In Brazil, such things still sound like science fiction. If nothing is done, we will miss out on yet another industrial revolution. History shows that we have a habit of missing the boat. The first industrial revolution passed Brazil by because the country was still a colony. The second industrial revolution occurred during The Empire. It proved a flash in the pan and came to nothing in the decades that followed under The Republic.Considering the country's troubling track record of wasting opportunities, Leadership and Organizational Culture for Innovation gives Brazil the tools it needs to avoid making yet more blunders. With sharp analysis based on reliable data, the book describes why innovation has become key to organizations' future. The authors argue that innovation is key to maximizing the impact on corporate strategies and modernizing organizational culture. One of the most revealing aspects of the book is proof that a company's size is not a ticket to success. What counts is the quality of leadership and the development of a culture for innovation. Corporate survival depends on adaptation to environmental changes. The companies that survive are not necessarily the strongest but rather the ones that best adapt to change. Innovation is a determining factor in corporate survival The book shows how this principle has been the main driver of corporate competitive advantage. Companies need to rethink and re-evaluate the development of new behavior patterns and habits. The authors call into question practices that they consider anachronistic, such as hierarchy in the workplace. While no one doubts that senior managers should play the leading role, new times call for an end to the vicious circle that stunts creativity and innovation. Brillo and Boonstra often point to inspiring initiatives. Yet there is no one recipe for success. In the affairs of Man, calculated improvisation still plays an important role. The authors recommend that leaders should practice what they preach when it comes to innovation. As in so many fields, practice makes perfect. In mapping the field of innovative companies, the authors show that the champions of creativity tend to take a holistic view of the world. This in turn makes initiatives balanced and sustainable both for firms and for the world at large. The authors call into question practices that they consider anachronistic, such as hierarchy in the workplace The book argues that there must be ongoing dialogue with clients, employees and other stakeholders on the role of company culture in the search for strategic changes. This process tends to be more successful when managers feel professionally challenged. It is not just about innovating; it is about developing a mindset that embraces an innovative culture. The thesis of innovation as a determining factor in corporate survival could not have better-qualified advocates than João Brillo and Jaap Boonstra, whose global reputation in conducting business and management studies draws on both their extensive corporate experience and their remarkable scholarly track records. With their complementary expertise, the authors help us reflect on how companies can develop their innovation 'DNA'. I believe that their conclusions both could and should be applied to governments as well. Brazil's management methods are some 30 years behind the times. Put another way, the country is missing out on the huge opportunities offered by modern technology. The public sector must not be allowed to act as a drag on the latest industrial revolution. Brazil would do well to follow Brillo and Boonstra's advice. The country's glacial progress in this field is partly a carry-over from the deepest and longest economic crisis in Brazil's recent history. Yet things will only get worse if we miss the boat this time round. We have to invest effectively if we are not to be left behind. It is sobering to see that Brazil's investment rate has fallen by 5.3 per cent over the last five years to just 15.6% of the country's Gross Domestic Product (GDP), a level well below that of those nations betting on the new Industrial Revolution. The first step on the path to a brighter future for Brazil would be to follow the sound advice of ESADE visiting professors Brillo and Boonstra and harness the opportunities offered by innovation.The book Liderança e Cultura Organizacional para Inovação will be released in November 2018.

ESADE

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The ticket to innovation

10/2018


José Ricardo Roriz


President, Federação das Indústrias do Estado de São Paulo (FIESP)




Given that the world's most developed countries are embarking on the 4th Industrial Revolution, the new book Liderança e Cultura Organizacional para Inovação [Leadership and Organizational Culture for Innovation] by ESADE visiting professors João Brillo and Jaap Boonstra is particularly timely. The book is both a warning and an invitation to Brazilian managers in the private and public sectors. The warning is clear: Brazil cannot afford to miss the chance of modernizing its economy. The invitation is just as important. Basing their arguments on practical theories and examples, the authors show how one can make a success of innovation.


Industry 4.0 (as the 4th Industrial Revolution has been called) is nothing more than the interconnection of state-of-the-art machines overseen by managers acting under the umbrella of innovation, in a process of permanent change, online. Technologies and human resources become fully integrated in companies when the aforementioned strands are properly interwoven.


I have traveled the world to get a closer look at innovative corporate and governmental experiences, some as paradigmatic as the cases presented by Brillo and Boonstra. What I saw in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Israel - were settings integrating concepts such as Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, The Internet of Things, Additive Manufacturing, Augmented Reality, Robotics, Intelligent Sensors, Virtual Simulations.



In Brazil, such things still sound like science fiction. If nothing is done, we will miss out on yet another industrial revolution. History shows that we have a habit of missing the boat. The first industrial revolution passed Brazil by because the country was still a colony. The second industrial revolution occurred during The Empire. It proved a flash in the pan and came to nothing in the decades that followed under The Republic.


Considering the country's troubling track record of wasting opportunities, Leadership and Organizational Culture for Innovation gives Brazil the tools it needs to avoid making yet more blunders.


With sharp analysis based on reliable data, the book describes why innovation has become key to organizations' future. The authors argue that innovation is key to maximizing the impact on corporate strategies and modernizing organizational culture.


One of the most revealing aspects of the book is proof that a company's size is not a ticket to success. What counts is the quality of leadership and the development of a culture for innovation. Corporate survival depends on adaptation to environmental changes. The companies that survive are not necessarily the strongest but rather the ones that best adapt to change.


Innovation is a determining factor in corporate survival


The book shows how this principle has been the main driver of corporate competitive advantage. Companies need to rethink and re-evaluate the development of new behavior patterns and habits. The authors call into question practices that they consider anachronistic, such as hierarchy in the workplace. While no one doubts that senior managers should play the leading role, new times call for an end to the vicious circle that stunts creativity and innovation.


Brillo and Boonstra often point to inspiring initiatives. Yet there is no one recipe for success. In the affairs of Man, calculated improvisation still plays an important role. The authors recommend that leaders should practice what they preach when it comes to innovation. As in so many fields, practice makes perfect.


In mapping the field of innovative companies, the authors show that the champions of creativity tend to take a holistic view of the world. This in turn makes initiatives balanced and sustainable both for firms and for the world at large.


The authors call into question practices that they consider anachronistic, such as hierarchy in the workplace


The book argues that there must be ongoing dialogue with clients, employees and other stakeholders on the role of company culture in the search for strategic changes. This process tends to be more successful when managers feel professionally challenged. It is not just about innovating; it is about developing a mindset that embraces an innovative culture.


The thesis of innovation as a determining factor in corporate survival could not have better-qualified advocates than João Brillo and Jaap Boonstra, whose global reputation in conducting business and management studies draws on both their extensive corporate experience and their remarkable scholarly track records.


With their complementary expertise, the authors help us reflect on how companies can develop their innovation 'DNA'. I believe that their conclusions both could and should be applied to governments as well. Brazil's management methods are some 30 years behind the times. Put another way, the country is missing out on the huge opportunities offered by modern technology. The public sector must not be allowed to act as a drag on the latest industrial revolution.



Brazil would do well to follow Brillo and Boonstra's advice. The country's glacial progress in this field is partly a carry-over from the deepest and longest economic crisis in Brazil's recent history. Yet things will only get worse if we miss the boat this time round.


We have to invest effectively if we are not to be left behind. It is sobering to see that Brazil's investment rate has fallen by 5.3 per cent over the last five years to just 15.6% of the country's Gross Domestic Product (GDP), a level well below that of those nations betting on the new Industrial Revolution.


The first step on the path to a brighter future for Brazil would be to follow the sound advice of ESADE visiting professors Brillo and Boonstra and harness the opportunities offered by innovation.


The book Liderança e Cultura Organizacional para Inovação will be released in November 2018.


More Knowledge
El significado de las culturas en las organizaciones
Boonstra, Jaap
Harvard Deusto Business Review
Nº 274, 01/2018, p. 18 - 28
Leadership and organizational culture based on sustainable innovational values: Portraying the case of the Global Alliance for Banking Based on Values (GABV)
Brillo de Carvalho, João Batista ; Boonstra, Jaap
06/2018
ESADE working paper; ; nº 270
40 p.
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